Wednesday, December 29, 2010

THE CLEANING CORNER

The other day as I was preparing for a holiday party at my home, when  I noticed that it had been far to long since I had last cleaned my kitchen blinds.  They are close to the sink and the stove, so they can get pretty nasty with all of the grease and splashing.  

As I attempted to wipe them off, I noticed that my efforts were futile, and that the grease was determined to stay, no matter how hard I scrubbed.  I went to my cleaning cupboard and searched for the perfect grease killer.  I returned to the blinds with 409!  It is officially my favorite cleaner in the world.  All I had to do was spray and wipe.  How I've missed that little detail in the past, I will never know. But I learn quickly, and now if there is ANY kind of grime that I need to remove, 409 is my best friend.  

I know that I probably sound like a walking 409 commercial, but I can't help sharing my discovery!

Note:  When using 409, direct contact is great on certain things, such as rock solid surfaces like granite.  But when it comes to some surfaces, such as kitchen cabinets, be sure to dilute the chemical in a water/409 solution.  High concentrated 409 can be dangerous for some surfaces. 

 
Fun little tidbit: "Where did 409 get it's name?"
409 was invented in 1957 by Morris D. Rouff (1909 – 1997). Along with his brothers Samuel and Nathan, Rouff was a partner in a Detroit, Michigan company, Gem Products, which manufactured industrial cleaning supplies. Formula 409’s original application was as a commercial solvent and degreaser for industries such as funeral homes and Chinese restaurants that struggled with particularly difficult cleaning problems. As a heavy-duty alkaline product, Formula 409 was harsher and more toxic than today’s residential cleaner, and was sold only in 40-gallon drums.
 
It got its name because a cleaner powerful enough to dissolve through grease and dirt on contact  doesn't get created on the 1st try, or the 401st.  Only when they had created their 409th formula were these young men satisfied that they had created the ultimate cleaner.

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